How To Treat Yeast Infection In Dogs Ears Naturally

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    how to treat ear infections of a ferocious dog?
    the dog is ferocious nd is suffering from severe ear infection naturally...

    • ANSWER:
      Step 1
      Trim the dog's ear hair away so much as possible. The less hair getting into the ear, the better! Increased air circulation aids healing and shortens recovery time.

      Step 2
      The easiest way to begin treating and preventing ear infections is diluted white vinegar. I use 1 part white vinegar to 1 part water for diluting. A cheap squeeze bottle with a nozzle is the easiest way to apply. (Pouring just gets you and the dog soaked and reeking of vinegar). This changes the pH in your dog's ear canal and helps with most yeast infection ear problems.

      Step 3
      Vitamin C can help reduce the inflammation. Adrenal glands produce a natural steroid, and Vit. C can help kick the adrenal glands into functioning more efficiently. Pets weighing under 15 pounds can take between 100 and 250 milligrams of vitamin C a day. Cats and dogs 15 to 50 pounds can take 250 to 500 milligrams a day, and larger dogs can take 500 milligrams two or three times a day.

      Good Luck!

      www.carewhiz.com

  2. QUESTION:
    Yeast infection...(Natural Remedies)!?
    My 2 year old German Shepherd has a yeast infection in his ears, skin, and anus.
    I have done a lot of research online and many web sites suggest using vinegar, yogurt etc.

    My question is;
    Do you know of any ALL NATURAL remedies known to treat and cure yeast infections in dogs?

    Please respond only if you have treated this condition your animal all naturally and gotten good results.

    Please tell me what you used, how much, and how often.

    -Thank you!!
    To: PomMom Spay & Neuter
    You are so horribly mistaken, it pains me to even read your uneducated response.
    There are tons of all natural remedies to treat this condition. Not to mention thousands of success stories on the internet.
    I am asking for other peoples PERSONAL experience and knowledge about this condition. I do not believe in pumping my animal full of harmful and toxic medications. You are exactly the type of closed minded person who I did not want replying to my question.

    • ANSWER:
      Lack of answers must tell you there are no natural home remedies and your dog needs to be treated by a vet.

      ADD:
      That's exactly what they are...STORIES - NOT fact. I can Google Big Foot on the internet - doesn't make it true! If it were that simple, you would have gotten a lot more responses! Call your vet and ask - the phone call is FREE. And how do you even know it's a yeast infection? Are you a vet? Looks like it's YOU that needs the education!

      Yeast infection is a FUNGUS and is killed with FUNGICIDE - NOT yogurt! ROLFLMAO

      The internet is NOT a suppose to be a substitute for proper vet care

  3. QUESTION:
    Mini Poodle with an ear infection.. Any suggestions OTHER THAN A VET?
    I am a vet tech. I just got a Mini Poodle today and found that he's got an yeast ear infection. I'm looking for a NATURAL way to treat/cure his poor ears! I do agree that taking him to the vet is the best, so please don't tell me to take him, because I already know! I honestly don't believe the medication they will give him will fix it, because I had a dog years ago who had chronic ear infections and nothing helped that the vet did!

    I was told of some natural ways to cure yeast-infected ears, but I forgot! Does anyone know of NATURAL ways to treat his ears OTHER THAN TAKING HIM TO THE VET!! Please don't mention vet's because I don't believe that's something vet's can really do, it's a waste of money! I went to school for vet tech, so I'm not uneducated as far as veterinary care for animals!

    It is definitely a YEAST ear infection. The smell, texture, and color of his ear leather confirms.
    i WENT to school to be a vet tech. PAST TENSE. worked in a vet office as a tech for over 1 year. had major health problems that prevented me from working in the veterinary field.

    i don't have my books anymore, thus the reason i have to ask you idiots. look up Florida Institute of Animal Arts. I graduated from the vet course in 2008.
    also, as stated before, I GOT THE DOG TODAY! some old guy owned him and didnt want him anymore, im guessing because of the ear infection as well as the skin problems he has. so dont blame me for something I'M TRYING TO CURE THAT SOME GUY DIDNT WANT TO DEAL WITH!!

    its not that i don't want to spend the money, i have more than enough to spend. i would rather do it holistic and without him getting manhandled by random people that dont know what they are doing to begin with!

    • ANSWER:
      well ms. vet tech ... clearly you did not study up too well in vet tech school because there are no effective ways to treat an ear infection "naturally" ... if it could be done "naturally" your career choice would be obsolete ... the dog needs medication from the vet and you taking the dog from a guy who could not care for the dog only for you to take the dog and not care for the dog, what is the difference ... you have a yahoo answers account ??? and i really have to question your vet tech and dog ownership experience ... my dog swims in the ocean almost daily and does get recurrent ear infections ... two squishes of Surolan (http://www.universalpetmeds.ca/medications/Surolan/Drops) and the dog is good as new ... allowed to get out of control the dog is in extreme pain ... you do not take on a new animal that already has medical problems you can not address effectively (yahoo answers is not effectively) ...

  4. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know about Briard ears?
    I have a 10 year old briard. Her ears are not cropped, we decided not to have them cropped because 1) our vet didn't think it was necessary for any health reasons and 2) we thought they were cuter that way anyway so why not avoid the pain for her? She (and her brothers) have had ear infections. Does the long ear have anything to do with the ear infection? I know that yeast infections can be cause by diet so that is not what I'm asking, she has had other strains than yeast. Our dogs LOVE the water, can it be that the long ears don't let enough air in to dry them out? Especially with the long hair? Thanks to anyone who knows :)
    Are briards with cropped ears less-prone to infection?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes and yes. Ask any cocker breeder -- long hairy ears without weekly care = infection. All this no crop nonsense -- a crop is no big deal. I've been there for tons of them. It is quick, simple and any pain when they wake up can't be much, because they all are far more interested in their food than their ears! They fast before the crops naturally for the anesthetics. A spay or neuter is far more painful and invasive than an ear crop.

      Clean your Briard's ears with this -- it will also cure ear infections used according to directions.

      BLUE POWER EAR SOLUTION

      INGREDIENTS:
      16 Oz. Isopropyl Alcohol
      4 Tablespoons Boric Acid Powder
      16 Drops Gentian Violet Solution 1%

      Mix together in alcohol bottle and shake well.
      You will also need to shake solution every time you use it to disperse the Boric Acid Powder.

      TREATMENT: Evaluate condition of ears before treating and if very inflamed and sore do not attempt to pull hair or clean out ear at all.

      Wait until inflammation has subsided which will be about 2 days.
      Shake the bottle each time before using.
      Put cotton balls or similiar absorbent material under the ear.
      Flood the ear with solution, (gently squirt bottle), massage gently to the count of 60, wipe with a tissue.
      Flood again on first treatment, wipe with a tissue, and leave alone without massage.

      The dog will shake out the excess which can be wiped with a tissue, cotton ball, etc as the Gentian Violet does stain fabrics.

      The SCHEDULE of treatment is as follows:
      Treat 2x per day for the first week to two weeks depending upon severity of ears
      Treat 1x per day for the next 1-2 weeks
      Treat 1x per month (or even less frequently, depending on the dog)

      All of these ingredients should be available at a pharmacy.
      The Boric Acid Powder soothes the ear.
      The Gentian Violet Solution is an anti-infection agent.
      The solution appears to work well on any and all ear problems from mites to wax to canker.

      After the 2nd or 3rd day you can clean out the ear with a Q-tip or cotton balls.

      The success rate for this treatment is 95-99%.

      If an infection seems to be remaining in the treated ear after the above course of treatment, you may also have some Pseudomonas bacteria in the site.

      This can be eradicated by using a gentle flush of raw apple cider vinegar and wateR(warm)

      Use 2 Tablespoons of vinegar to one cup of water, 2 x per week.

      They have found the Blue Powder Solution to be effective for treating fungus-type infections on the feet and elsewhere on the dog, for cuts on dogs or people, and for hot spots.

      Remember it is for external use only ..so be careful not to get into the eyes.

  5. QUESTION:
    What might cause a recurrent yeast infection in a dog's ears?

    The dog was checked by a vet, and there are no ear mites.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to add a lactobacillus acidophilus capsule to your dog's food every day. Just pull the capsule apart and mix the powder in her food. This balances the yeast and strengthens the immune system.

      These good bacteria occur naturally in our system, but if there aren't enough to balance the yeast that's in our system too, the yeast will take over, causing a yeast infection. These are the same bacteria that are found in yoghurt.

      Many dogs like yoghurt as a treat, and it's good for them. Also, if your dog ever has to take antibiotics, make sure you give her acidophilus every day too. The antibiotics kill the acidophilus, as well as the harmful bacteria.

      Also be sure to dry your dogs ears inside thoroughly every time she gets them wet.

  6. QUESTION:
    Worried about my dog...?
    He's always itching some place near his hind legs. It's either that or he's always itching around his ear. He got bit on the ear multiple times by our friend's Stafford shire Bull Terrier x Greyhound a few day's ago. He also always coughs, but never chucks or anything. Does anyone know what's wrong with him?

    • ANSWER:
      I see a few possible causes for the itching. Itching can be caused by an allergic reaction (to flea bites, the food or treats you give him, the grooming products or house-cleaning products you are using), mites or steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot'). Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      Many dogs are allergic to flea bites so even one flea on an allergic dog may cause a lot of havoc. You may not be able to see the fleas directly but you can always see the debris they leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If you see these and put them in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas on your dog with natural methods so that he is not exposed to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will harm him sooner or later. Check this link for recommendations http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where he roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on its use to control fleas see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check the ingredients of the food/treats you give him. Dogs digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. If they contain grains such as wheat or corn stop them immediately. Get food/treats that have no grains and that have meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      If you just introduced a new grooming product (or a house cleaning product), discontinue it immediately.

      MITES

      There are three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      If the reason for the itching is mites, avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals that will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend a natural, effective, easy to use, and inexpensive spray treatment that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Vets nowadays assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal) such as the ones commonly caused by the use of steroids like Prednisone, cortisone or the so called allergy shot or any secondary infections caused by flea bite allergy or mites, as well as cuts, scrapes, etc. I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  7. QUESTION:
    Dogs ears shedding and dry?
    I noticed her ears were really dry. So I looked at them, and even if you just grab them, since her ears are so dry the hair comes off with the skin. The tips are now hairless. She's perfectly healthy and I'm sure it's not mites. But does anyone have suggestions on how to help it?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc. that may cause an unpleasant odor)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')
      - Bathing too often

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections (remedy below).

      ALLERGIES

      Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of potential allergens i.e. grooming or house cleaning products. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      Bathing too often strips the natural oils that protect the skin. Bathing once a month is enough.

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone, kenalog or the nondescript allergy shot ) are very dangerous and do not cure anything. They just mask the symptoms temporarily by suppressing the immune system's normal response and cause undesirable health complications.

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please check the link below:

      http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2010/08/17/stop-using-pet-steroids-until-you-read-these-disturbing-truths.aspx

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  8. QUESTION:
    Mt dog is itching very bad, what can I do to help?
    Going to the vet is out of the question. She is not due for a checkup for another few months, and my mom absolutely will not take her.
    The worst spot seems to be her rear end, the parts she can reach she's chewed some fur off, including a bald spot on her tall now.
    She is constantly rubbing her back on the rugs, grass, cement and even sometimes the tile floors, though I don't think that is much help.
    Her ears are also getting bad too. she almost moans when you rub them for her.
    This has been escalating for 2-3 years now, my mom has been just blaming it on seasonal allergies, but she has it all year round now.

    i have got 2 other dogs, neither of them are having any problems so I don't think it is flea or mite related. Last checked, she did not have worms (I have read that can cause itching) and she has no other symptoms.
    Today, she was laying upstairs on the couch and she had woke me up making a weired howling sound, that she's never made before. I ran upstairs, she looked like she was in trouble, jumped off the couch and sat in front of me, inching her self forward like she's saying 'pet me' and she made the howling sound again, just a lower pitch.
    She is near 10 years old, and she is a mix and a Red and a Blue healer. As far as I am aware it is not genetic, none of her sisters, or parents have any problems.
    I think it is a food alergie, though my mom claims it is not because she is not chewing her paws, but she has been licking them more and more.
    I'm looking for things I can do to help the itching for her, but taking her to the vet is out of the question as I first mentioned.

    • ANSWER:
      Itching and skin irritation can be caused by factors such as:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming products or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.) See a remedy below
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections with associated bad odor.

      ALLERGIES

      To allergic dogs even one flea can cause havoc. Even if you do not see fleas, you can always see the debris they leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on its use to control fleas see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check ingredients of food/treats. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      Discontinue grooming products (or house cleaning products) that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and anticeptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal), I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  9. QUESTION:
    What do I use for my dog who has a yeast infection on her feet?
    My 2 year old Boxer has a yeast infection (Dx'ed) in both her back paws. I don't have money to pay for prescriptions. What is a very good, yet inexpensive home remedy?

    Here's some things I have heard...
    -plain yogurt
    -apple vinegar
    -Selson blue
    Home remedies do work. Most active ingredients that are in your expensive medicines are things you can find around your house. To Joanplus... go away.
    I used Nutragena T-Gel and it cleared it up. Thanks for all the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have a 3 year old Bulldog, and he's had yeast infections in his ears, and on his paws. The vet told me it's pretty common for his breed, and sent me home with some acetic acid 5% solution for his ears (acetic acid, by the way, is vinegar), and some anti-fungal wipes for his feet. These two items cost a total of .00 at my vet, and they cleared up his infection over the course of about a month..

      While I agree with you that some home remedies do work, yeast is particularly hard to get rid of with out using harsh chemicals or medications. Yeasts are made up of roots and spores. It's the spores that can remain dormant on or in your dog and flare up, causing another infection after the first one is cleared up. It's nealy impossible to kill these spores without an anti-fungal mediction.
      While you are absolutely right that a lot of our expensive prescriptions come from natural items "around the house", medicine has found a way to take these natural items and take out their active compounds or chemicals, and concentate them into a cure. Good examples of these medicines would be morphine, penicillin, and Taxol (the cancer treatment). Taxol comes from the yew tree, and it a very effective treatment for cancer, but in order to get enough paclitaxel (the active compound) for one dose, a person would need to somehow ingest one entire tree. Penicillin may have been discovered on a moldy orange, but to get enough medicine for one dose, a person would have to eat literally pounds and pounds of moldy oranges. Do you see where I'm going with this?
      Cider vinegar may seem like a good remedy, especially since I mentioned that the ear medicine from the vet was, in essence, vinegar. You should know that a yeast infection leaves your dog's skin somewhat raw, and putting vinegar on it is going to sting and burn. It will also inflame the area and could potentially hurt your dog more than help. Cider vinegar is also a fermented product, and will contain yeasts naturally. This probably won't help your dog. The solution from the vet is pure and sterile, medical grade acetic acid solution. It still stings and burns, but it will ultimately help.
      Plain yogurt, with no sugar or fruit added is a wonderful addition to any dog's diet, occasionally. Yogurt with "live and active cultures" is full of the good bacteria that can combat the bad bacteria in the digestive tract. It's really useful when yourdog has to be on an antibiotic for an illness. Yeast, however, is not a bacteria. It is a fungus.
      Selsun Blue is a popular dandruff shampoo, available just about anywhere. And it's true that the suspected, though not proven, cause of dandruff is a yeast-like organism called Pityrosporum Ovale. See the SPORUM in there? Sounds like a yeast, doesn't it? Unfortunately, it isn't. The active ingredient, selenium sulfide, only prevents this particular organism from being able to grow on skin. The yeast on your dog's paws is probably a strain of Candida or tinea, which require different medications. A tube of Monistat cream will most likely work, since it is specifically made for treating Candida, but unless you know for sure that that is what your dog has, I'd just get the stuff from the vet. Monistat has to be left on the skin, uncovered, in order to work as a topical treatment. This means that you'd somehow have to keep your dog from licking it. One of those radar dish collars would probably help. I'd think that soaking your dog's feet in Epsom salts, then drying thoroughly with paper towels and a hair dryer, and applying the cream would work best. You have to also keep in mind that the only place on your dog's body that can sweat is the paws, and so they will be constantly moist since it's summertime. You will have to wash, epsom salt, dry, and reapply the cream several times a day.

      I know you care about your dog, and I'm glad you are trying to help him/her. I just want you to be informed about the decisions you are considering so that you can do the most for your pet. I hope he or she gets well soon!

  10. QUESTION:
    What are these scabs behind dogs ears?
    I have a staffy cross breed who is a year old, recently I have noticed little black/brown scab like things Just underneath his ears and to the back a little, firstly it was only on one side now it is on both and there are little scab like spots also. They will not scratch off and I am getting a little worried. He has been itching a lot and biting his leg constantly. My boyfriend thinks it's fleas and the scabs are flea mess but I'm not too sure as I have not seen any no matter how much I look in his fur! please help :(

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  11. QUESTION:
    I found a stray dog, help?
    So there is this golden retriever that has been wandering up to my house looking for food everyday a couple times for about over a week now. I finally let him inside and gave him some food and water. He was following me around and he finally got comfortable and lied down by the fireplace. The poor guy, I don't know if he is old or not but he seems sad and has his tail between his legs. He smells weird and some of his skin and ears look grey and wrinkled, what should I do about him?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc. that may cause an unpleasant odor)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')
      - Bathing too often

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red. One can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to toxic chemicals in popular spot-on and pill flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later http://www.apnm.org/publications/resources/fleachemfin.pdf For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, the yard where the dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Avoid any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Commercial foods should have meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Grooming or house cleaning products can be potential allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      Bathing too often strips the natural oils that protect the skin. Bathing once a month is enough.

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      Many vets prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  12. QUESTION:
    My dog keeps biting his skin please help!?
    My dog has hot spots on his skin and he keeps biting and scratching them ... the vet always recommends something that seems to make it worse .. i would really like to try something natural or at home ... he also has reoccuring ear yeast infections that hes had since he was small .. and once again whatever the vet gives me ends up costing so much just to find that it makes it worse and always makes it come back.. please help !

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, don't listen to the person who says you aren't fit to own a pet. Owning a pet is hard and you have to learn somehow. My vet was bad, and didn't act fast...as a result our cat died. My suggestion is maybe find a different vet, some just aren't as good as others.
      I looked around and here are some links about skin conditions and also yeast problems for your dog. I hope it helps

      http://ezinearticles.com/?Yeast-Infections-in-Dogs&id=1308080
      http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_yeast_infection_of_the_skin.html
      http://www.greatdanelady.com/articles/systemic_yeast_mini_course.htm
      http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/diseasesall/a/itching.htm
      http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/health/skin.htm
      http://www.recoverysa.com/dermatitis_pro.htm

      It could be a skin condition such as mites or overheating- you can look through and see what fits, then do a search on Google on how to treat it naturally from there

  13. QUESTION:
    Dog scratching behind his ears?
    My 1 1/2 yr old chihuahua boy has been scratching his ears for months. At first I thought it was either the weather or his dry skin, but it wasn't going away so I took him to the vet. He was tested for ear mites, but the result came out to be negative. The vet couldn't really find out a specific reason to his symptom, so my dog was given a steroid shot and some ointment. He said it could be food allergy, so I threw away his Wellness Core and switched to Natural Balance Limited Ingredient Formula. I used to give him a lot of treats too but I cut that out to just chicken breast (dehydrated at home). His ears were healing well until now (it's been 2 weeks since I last visited the vet), but I just found a huge scratch behind his ear AGAIN! It now looks like he's scratching one of his ears.. so I guess half of the problem is fixed.. but what can I do more to stop him from hurting himself?! I'm probably gonna have to visit the vet again soon, but I was wondering if anyone went through something similar or has any idea what the cause might be. Thanks!
    The vet also said inside his ears look clean so it must be some kind of skin problem..

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  14. QUESTION:
    how can I get rid of foul smelling ears on my dog?
    My little dog suffers from yeast infections in her ears. Not sure if it diet, or if it's the hair inside her ears. It starts with a foul smell, and develops into an infection. I wonder if there is another way to treat this naturally? She already has switched to a fish only diet which has helped her to stop constantly licking her paws. How can I lower the levels of yeast in my dog's system? And get rid of this smell!

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    Why is my dogs skin like this?
    He's lost a lot of fur around his mouth, ears, inside of legs. I went for a skin scraping and they didn't find mange or any other parasite. He's always scratching it as well. He sleeps under my gazebo where it's just dirt so maybe a different parasite? Goodwinol ointment works on him except as soon as I stop using it his skin gets inflamed again, I want to treat the problem not just prevent it. Any home remedies? Is it possible they missed the mange parasite? He's mixed with great pyrenees and ruff collie and is almost 2 years old.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  16. QUESTION:
    my dog has a skin problem?
    I got rid of the scabes with 5 2 week doses of Revolution. Now she has a pungent fowl odor, very oily skin/fur and the eruption of bumps on her back. Her ears have a grainy feel - maybe mites? I use swabs of peroxide on her ears and the grainy feel goes away for a day or two, but gradually comes back. I've paid a lot (for me) to vets for each little question. I feel manipulated by them for $$$. Please share your information with me for my dog's sake. I've been washing my dog with Benzine-peroxide shampoo which works for about a week, then she starts smelling and itching again. When I shampoo her, I see redness in patches beneath her fur. She always got sickish on the Revolution and didn't eat much. I don't want to give her that stuff again.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation and/or hair loss) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming products or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.) See a remedy below
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections sometimes coupled with a bad odor.

      ALLERGIES

      To allergic dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on flea control see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check food/treats ingredients. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      Discontinue use of grooming products or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and anticeptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  17. QUESTION:
    what can I use to help my dog stop itching?
    the fleas are under control with med, but he scratches so bad around his ears and shoulders he bleeds.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  18. QUESTION:
    Why is my dog losing hair?
    I have a 13 month old boxer female. She lives in the apartment with me and doesn't spend too much time outside and is only around one other dog. I've noticed her scratching a fair bit of late. She does once a week go to my girlfriends parents where they have a young weenie dog that sometimes bites her and I thought maybe she was scratching her wounds. She is also missing hair on the back of her neck (small patches). Her collar is not tight and she acts very happy and healthy. But the worst spots are on the ends of her ears. What could it be?
    Also any home treatments would be preferable to everyone just telling me to take her to the vet. I am a poor college student working part time living on my own and can't just throw the money away. However if this is something potentially serious, I won't hesitate to make whatever sacrifice needs to be made.
    Any suggestions or experiences would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation and/or hair loss) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming products or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.) See a remedy below
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections sometimes coupled with a bad odor.

      ALLERGIES

      To allergic dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on flea control see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check food/treats ingredients. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      Discontinue use of grooming products or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and anticeptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  19. QUESTION:
    My dog has hair loss?
    I have a 7 month pitbull whose hair isn't as full around his mouth area as well as infront of the ears or like where the temples on the human forehead is. He does have dry skin, flakes come off above his tail but there is no hair loss there. I don't think it is allergies because my 4 year old pitbull is allergic to grain as well as a certain flea so I know the symptoms to it. They are on flea medication also. It's just worrying me a bit lol

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc. that may cause an unpleasant odor)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')
      - Bathing too often

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections (remedy below).

      ALLERGIES

      Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red. You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to toxic chemicals in popular spot-on and pill flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later http://www.apnm.org/publications/resources/fleachemfin.pdf For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of potential allergens i.e. grooming or house cleaning products. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      Bathing too often strips the natural oils that protect the skin. Bathing once a month is enough.

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  20. QUESTION:
    What can I do about my dog scratching at herself all the time?
    First of all, I AM taking her to a vet. She is scheduled for next week because that's what's available. She needs to get her vaccines anyway.

    I've checked her for fleas, and she was in the vet's a few weeks ago and they didn't notice anything. Since her last visit, the itchiness has gotten worse. She has scabs on one of her ears and a small patch of sparce fur at the base of her tail.

    Some background:
    She has had a UTI before and was treated for that, and put on a special diet (Science Diet, a brand that is low-protein, gran-free, acidic, and contains cranberries, which is what she needs). She eats well.
    She is a pitbull-plott hound mix (plott hounds are a type of coon hound, but pretty much only show up in the South USA). She is a rescue and I got her from a foster home with a bunch of other dogs.
    She is otherwise a very healthy dog, in pique condition.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation and/or hair loss) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming products or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.) See a remedy below
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections sometimes coupled with a bad odor.

      ALLERGIES

      To allergic dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on flea control see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check food/treats ingredients. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      Discontinue use of grooming products or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and anticeptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  21. QUESTION:
    My dog won't stop scratching himself ?
    I have a 3 year old Jack Russell Terrier, he has recently started scratching his skin non stop, I have inspected it and can't see any fleas but have noticed some of his fur is coming off on the ends of his ears it seems dry. He's my first dog and I've only had him a week so hoping some experienced dog owners could give me an idea on what's up with him? Should I bath him or could it make him worse?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  22. QUESTION:
    Dog has been constantly licking/chewing paw for months. Could it be mange?
    I have a small dog (bichon pekingese mix)
    When I got him about a year ago he was being kept in bad conditions to the point that the fur on his paws was stained yellow from standing in his own urine for so long. He has long hair and it took months to get them back to white.
    He also had ear mites which after a month of trying different treatments we finally got rid of.
    He has always liked to chew his right foot but it seems it is constantly getting worse. Before I go to the vet and spend a bunch of money on tests I am hoping I can try a few over the counter things for him.
    It started out just being a small spot on his paw but now it is almost all the way up his legs. The fur is stained pink, I imagine from his saliva.
    When i go through the fir, there are tiny reddish specs on his skin, then don't move but can be scratched off. Some places there is just one or two, some places there are clusters of about 10.
    When I google the only thing that comes up is red mange and I feel that would have moved over his body by now or caused a loss of fur.

    Any ideas of what it could be or whether or not it may be mange would be very very appreciated.
    Also, there is no foul odor so a yeast infection is unlikely, he is on a monthly preventative for worms. I also have a cat and they sleep next to each other sometimes and she has not shown any signs that she has it.
    He is allergic to wheat and I figured his paw would get better once he was off food with wheat, but no such luck. He stopped throwing up but the paw problem still persists.
    Another thing that I forgot to be specific about is that he has had this issue since I got him last year which makes me doubt very much that it is mange. He did have fleas when I got him but he went through several flea treatments and we did a carpet and upholstery treatment as well. We don't use much for cleaning products other then vinegar and baking soda.
    I am thinking I will just have to get him to the vet and have them take a look and do a scrape.
    Thanks for your answers

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc. that may cause an unpleasant odor)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')
      - Bathing too often

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections (remedy below).

      ALLERGIES

      Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of potential allergens i.e. grooming or house cleaning products. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      Bathing too often strips the natural oils that protect the skin. Bathing once a month is enough.

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone, kenalog or the nondescript allergy shot ) are very dangerous and do not cure anything. They just mask the symptoms temporarily by suppressing the immune system's normal response and cause undesirable health complications.

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please check the link below:

      http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2010/08/17/stop-using-pet-steroids-until-you-read-these-disturbing-truths.aspx

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can be easily accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flowers of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  23. QUESTION:
    dog had hairloss on joints and other places, what is causing it?
    I have a one year old mixed breed dog. (She looks a lot like an Italian grey hound mix but the humane society listed her as a beagle/lab) She has always seemed to have fairly thin hair on her belly and on her joints but recently the skin in those places has appeared reddish pink and are completely bald. I also noticed a section on the tip of her tail about a quarter of an inch long that is completely bald and had a very small scab on it. I've also noticed she will have a scab on her ear that is fairly small that I assumed was a fly bite or just from her still being a hyper puppy that likes to play ruff with the other animals in the house. She has never been a big eater and is over all thin but still a healthy weight. I feed her Purina One since it seems to be the only dry food she will eat that hasn't been doctored up. I was never concerned with all of these things on their own but now I wonder if she could have some sort of vitamin deficiency or if her diet is missing some nutrient that is causing the hair loss. If anyone has any sort of insight I would love hearing what you think. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  24. QUESTION:
    Why is my dog scratching so much?
    Please read this in full before answering and take note that my dog has seen 6 regular veterinarians and 2 holistic veterinarians for this problem so please, do not tell me to go see a veterinarian. I am asking to see if there is anyone out there who can help me by telling me if there is something we have missed.

    My shih tzu is 3 years old and has been scratching, biting and licking her entire life. When she is at her worst, her skin will get flaky and sometimes I will find patches of dry, flaky skin and even scabs on her back, legs and chest. We very rarely sleep through a full night because of this. Additionally, it has caused recurring bladder and ear infections (at least the veterinarians say it has caused this). Two more things that might be pieces to the puzzle: She has chronic dry eye and appears to be allergic to sweet potatoes.

    Sometimes it gets a little better and other times it is worse but the scratching never completely goes away. Regular vets have ruled-out fleas and told me that it is an allergy issue. They have offered to put her on a steroid that will stop the scratching, but over time, could cause Cushing's Disease and doesn't actually fix the problem. In fact, it could end up making the scratching worse. I don't want to do that. I became so desperate as to try asking 2 different holistic vets who claim that it is a candidia (yeast) overgrowth problem and have treated her with their herbs for several months with no major change.

    Here is her treatment regimen:
    -Baths 2 times per week using Oxymed shampoo and conditioner (Containing oatmeal, tea tree oil and salicylic acid - sometimes this gives her relief, other times it does not. Anytime I use different products, the itching does get worse)

    Every-day regimen:

    -RAW FOOD (Been on it for months, hasn't seemed to make any difference)
    -Benadryl (Usually just at night, but sometimes during the day - helps somewhat)
    -Fish oil - two extra strength human gels per day (Used to help, but doesn't seem to do much anymore)
    -Vitamin E once per day
    -Probiotics (Powder form, made for animals)
    -Plain Chobani yogurt
    -Trigger Immune (Holistic herbs said to boost her immune response)
    -Yeast and Fungal Detox (Holistic herbs said to rid the body of yeast and fungus)
    -Another herb that is supposed to help the body rid itself of any parasites

    One of the things that is truly frustrating is that sometimes, without any understandable reason, she'll get a little better so I'll think that what I am doing is actually working but then a few days later, she'll get really bad again. This is making it impossible for me to be able to tell what is working and what isn't.

    What am I missing? My dog and I would both be grateful for anyone who can recommend something that I haven't already listed above or can give us an idea of what might be going on here. Thank you!
    Bindysdogs: Like I said, the vets have ruled-out fleas. Are you saying she could still be having allergies to fleas even if she does not have them? Can you elaborate?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. If possible, raw food diet is best.

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  25. QUESTION:
    Why is my dog constantly itching?
    I've had my pup since he was about 8 weeks old, and at about 11 weeks of age he started little scratching here and there. Now he is almost 15 weeks and itching is almost constant. At first the vet said he had dry skin, so I implemented a coat supplement and all that did was make his coat shiny, but didn't do much for the itching. Then he said to give him benedryl to help with what might be a reaction to something.

    The benedryl does seem to relieve his itching but I'm looking for a more permanent solution. I just don't see putting a band aide on the problem all the time as a good idea. The vet wants to do blood tests and cultures but said it would be a couple hundred to perform. I have a newborn baby, so money is kinda tight now. Is there anything I can do to try and resolve the problem before I fork out money for the tests?

    If so, in what order should I try it. I know process of elimination is key. He is a 15 week old indoor German Shepherd. His food is Wolf Cub by Solid Gold and drinks lots of water!. He weighs about 42lbs (about), he's indoors for the most part except when exercising and doing his dirty business. He is itching everywhere but most of it seems at the base of his tail. Itching includes head (but did not start there), forearms, and now has thining fur behind one ear. Doesn't seem to itch the pads of his feet or claws. Itching is mainly on forearms by elbow. Itching is causing scabbing now under fur and doesn't seem to have a specific time of day to flare up.

    Any help or advice is appreciated. I hadn't switched foods yet because Wolf Cub is a high quality grain free (except brown rice) kibble. But if suggested, which one should I put him on now?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming products or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections sometimes coupled with a bad odor. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      To allergic dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check food/treats ingredients. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      Discontinue use of grooming products or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  26. QUESTION:
    natural remedies for dog?
    i have a miniature schnauzer(not mixed) well she gets very flaky skin and itches a lot so i changed her food more better for her without the corn fillers and evrything and i have been adding pure salmon oil to her food but i wanted to know a little more about stuff that i can do for her.i recently have been adding apple cider vinigar to her water bowl but i don't know if it is working because her water bowl is huge and im not sure how much to add so i have been adding 2 spoonfuls in her water so can anyone tell me how much i should put in?

    Also i am thinking about buying some pure coconut oil for her skin and for her food i hear that has some good benifits to it. what do you think? and if so how much should i give her she is really tiny like maybe 27 pounds at the most.(will include clip btw she does not look normal miniature schnauzer because her ear are not clipped)

    and if there are any other natural remedies that have worked for your dog please let me know i would love to know about them :)

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  27. QUESTION:
    What's wrong with my dog?
    This is occurring on/around my dogs ear. The skin looks dead almost and is flaky towards where the fur meets the skin...the hair pulls away very easily and in pretty big clumps..what is this and why is it happening and how can I fix it?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc. that may cause an unpleasant odor)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')
      - Bathing too often

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections (remedy below).

      ALLERGIES

      Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red. You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to toxic chemicals in popular spot-on and pill flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later http://www.apnm.org/publications/resources/fleachemfin.pdf For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of potential allergens i.e. grooming or house cleaning products. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      Bathing too often strips the natural oils that protect the skin. Bathing once a month is enough.

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone, kenalog or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below:

      http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2010/08/17/stop-using-pet-steroids-until-you-read-these-disturbing-truths.aspx

      Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything. They just mask the symptoms temporarily by suppressing the immune system's normal response and cause undesirable health complications.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  28. QUESTION:
    My puppy smells like hes sh ting his pants! lol?
    He's not been eating anything different than his normal dry food but has a foul odor like a fart but sooo much worse! And he's not pooping any more than normal. Any ideas? Thanks
    I'm not trolling! I'm serious and that's the only way I can explain it. He don't get into the garbage simply because he can't reach it yet, but I'm sure he wants to. He's stilj a baby so that might have something to do with it. I'm going to change his food and see if that helps. I'm almost certin its just passing gas but its horriable so I was looking for ideas.

    • ANSWER:
      Anal glands.
      Add 1/2 tablespoon of canned pumpkin, not pumpkin pie filling, to each meal for 3-5 days.
      This allows the glands to empty naturally.
      If the odor is coming from the ears Zymox, is available online without a prescription. It treats bacterial and yeast infections.
      Poor quality food.
      Read How to Chose a Healthy Dog Food
      http://www.dogster.com/dog-food/how-to-c
      Go to http://www.dogfoodanalysis.com/dog_food_
      Select a premium 5 or 6 star food.
      Grain free is best.

  29. QUESTION:
    My Golden Retriever Stinks?
    My Golden Retriever smells terrible. Awesome beautiful dog but her coat, ears and breath is horrid. We bathe her, clean her ears and brush her teeth. She is on an anti allergy pill but nothing seems to help. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      As I can't see her, I can only give 'generic' advice, but what you describe sounds like her problems are probably allergy-based. Goldens are very prone to allergy problems! My guess however, would be that she may have a secondary infection going on- in most cases, that is what accounts for bad smell from the skin and ears.

      Do you ever notice her licking her bottom and/or scooting along the ground? Dogs with allergy problems often get itchy around the bottom- persistant licking can result in bad breath often due to anal sac problems (impaction). This is generally a 'fishy' sort of smell. The other main cause of bad breath is of course the mouth itself. As you clean her teeth- have you noticed any tartar (brown) buildup on the teeth or any redness around her gums?

      Have you spoken to your vet about these problems? If not, I think you need to- her ears and skin should be checked for yeast and bacterial infection and treated if necessary. It certainly should be ruled out.

      What sort of 'anti allergy pill' is she on? Does she get itchy, and is she itchy at the moment? If she is having ongoing allergy problems, and nothing is helping, it may be worth talking with your vet about exploring the problem further, such as via referral to a veterinary dermatologist.

      In the meantime, what products are you using on her? She would probably benefit from a colloidal oatmeal shampoo- these are great for soothing itchy skin. How often do you bathe her? I would not be doing it more than once a week as more often may actually increase her problems. Be very careful not to get water in her ears. As Golden Gal said, over-frequent ear cleaning may also cause problems...in both cases this is due to excessive moisture in the ear canal and disruption of the normal environment, which provides perfect conditions for overgrowth of the organisms naturally present there.

      It may also be worth considering a fatty acid (omega-3 and -6) supplement. Like with colloidal oatmeal shampoos, these can be great in helping to control allergic skin disease.

      Also, do you have her on any kind of flea control? If not, it would be a good idea to put her on something like Advantage, at least in the short term, to rule out flea allergy as a contributor to her problems.

      I hope that gives you something to work with, and that you get her problems under control. I have an atopic dog myself (an allergic disease) and it can be a very frustrating experience at times (and must be a lot worse for her than for us).

  30. QUESTION:
    PLEASE I NEED GOOD ADVICE FOR MY BORDER COLLIE WHO IS NEARLY 12 YEARS OLD.?
    My lovely Border Collie dog he is nearly 12, he keeps getting a skin condition, ear infection and he is struggling on his back legs, he is at the vet tomorrow but every time he finishes his course of antibiotics and steroids he has the same problem. Is there anything i can do to help his health e.g vitamins, creams. He has a healthy diet and i exercise him, im so worried.
    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation and/or hair loss) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming products or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.) See a remedy below
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections sometimes coupled with a bad odor.

      ALLERGIES

      To allergic dogs even one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on flea control see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check food/treats ingredients. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      Discontinue use of grooming products or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and anticeptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  31. QUESTION:
    Which Foods Should I Feed My Adult Shih Tzu?
    At PetSmart they have a "Natural and Organic" Food section. I was wondering which of theese Dry Foods I should feed my dog..

    AvoDerm Natural,Blue Buffalo,Castor & Pollux,Eukanuba,Iams,Innova,Nature's Recipe,Nutro Max,Nutro Natural Choice,Nutro Ultra,Omega,Pro Plan,Simply Nourish,Wellness.

    And which wet foods...

    Natural Choice ,Pro Plan Selects, Nutro Max, Nature's Recipe, Nutro Ultra, Nutro Max,BLUE Homestyle Recipe , Nutro Natural Choice , BLUE Wilderness ,BLUE Freedom Grain-, AvoDerm, Innova,Simply Nourish,Eukanuba, Science Diet

    What Treats..
    Authority
    Blue Buffalo
    Blue Dog Bakery
    Canyon Creek Ranch
    Carolina Prime
    Castor & Pollux
    Charlee Bear
    Dentley's
    Dogcandy
    Dogswell
    Freshpet
    Fruitables
    Innova
    Kong
    Milk-Bone
    Milo's Kitchen
    Nature's Animals
    Nature's Recipe
    Newman's Own
    Nutro
    Nutro Natural Choice
    Nutro Ultra
    Nylabone
    Old Mother Hubbard
    Pet Botanics
    Prairie Dog Antlers
    Pro-Treat
    Science Diet
    Stewart True Chews
    VitaLife
    Wellness
    Wet Noses
    Zukes

    sorry for such a long question :/ I just want the best for my dog :)

    • ANSWER:
      To find a premium quality pet food read the ingredients list, not the advertising. The very first ingredient in a premium food will be meat (chicken, lamb, etc) not meat or chicken meal. A premium food will not have corn/corn products listed at all. as with people your pets health starts with good nutrition. Better food, better overall health. As a bonus as the pet uses more of the food it produces a smaller less stinky stool. Some of the best brands include california natural, solid gold, innova and merrick. If you live in an area where these brands are not available just read the ingredients lists, the guide lines are the same.

      The following is a list of ingredients that you should try to stay away from when purchasing dog food:

      1) By-products. By-products are what is left over after the processing plants remove what meat is fit for human consumption and send it to the grocery stores. By products can contain anything from chicken heads and feet, to cow hooves and horns, fur, feathers, blood, skin, bone, feces, and even dirt and sawdust from the floors. By products are not kept fresh, and in some cases have even been known to sit in containers for 5 days or more before being picked up from the meat plant and taken to the dog food rendering plant.

      2) Corn in any form, including ground yellow corn,corn meal, and corn gluten meal. Corn is what is called a 'filler,' and it serves one purpose in pet food - to make the animal feel full. Dogs and cats cannot digest corn, so it just passes right through the digestive system and you get the privilege of cleaning it up when it comes out the other end. Some dogs are also allergic to corn, so just avoid any foods that contain any form of corn in their ingredients listing.

      3) 'General' ingredients like animal fat,animal digest, and meat meal - you have no idea what these could contain (and you don't want to know). Instead, you want to look for things that are more specific, like chicken fat and chicken meal, that way you know exactly what is in the food.

      4) Chemical preservatives such as propylene glycol, ethoxyquin,BHA,and BHT. Chemical preservatives make the food last longer, but every single one of them has been proven to cause cancer and other life-threatening diseases in lab rats. They will tell you that in small quantities, the preservatives are safe, but if you stop and think about it, your dog will be ingesting small quantities of these preservatives every day over his entire life span. They then build up to toxic levels inside his body and that's when they become dangerous and cancer-causing. You want food that's been naturally preserved. Mixed tocopherols is a natural preservative.

      5) Soy, in any form. Soy is another filler, like corn, and some dogs are also severely allergic to it. It's best to just stay away from foods containing soy altogether.

      6) Sorghum is another filler. Sorghum is an Old World grass that is cultivated as grain and forage.

      7) Wheat - I only say this because some dogs are allergic to wheat. If your dog isn't allergic to wheat, then foods with wheat flour are okay. It won't hurt him unless he's allergic to it, and then you'll know because he'll likely develop skin problems.

      8) Salt, while found in many dog foods, is an unnecessary ingredient, so if the dog food you choose contains salt, make sure it's down near the bottom of the list of ingredients, as there is usually a form of sodium in the added vitamins, and you don't want to be giving your dog too much of it.

      9) Brewer's yeast. Again, some dogs have a problem with this ingredient, so watch for skin problems and/or ear infections if your dog food contains yeast.

      10) Flax is something else that some dogs do not tolerate well. Some dogs have no problem with it whatsoever, but others do. It isn't something that causes severe problems though - usually it just causes softer stool as opposed to outright allergic reactions. Usually.

      I know this seems like a lot, but if you want the best for your dog, you just aren't going to get that if the food you feed him contains the ingredients named above http://experts.about.com/q/Dogs-701/pupp...

      As for treats I ffed Pure Bites. They have 1 ingredient. The one I feed says," Ingredient, Chicken"

  32. QUESTION:
    My puppy is scratching himself till he bleeds?
    My family has recently adopted a new member to the family. The pup is Chihuahua mixed with rat terrier. he has had a vet appointment for his shots recently. But I've noticed scabs on him and he does scratch a lot. I notice he has fleas and am treating him for it now. But he's still scratching and one of the cuts is pretty bad. and now's he scratching his ears and cutting them up. He even cries when he itches because it hurts. Is there anyway I can stop the itching till the flea stuff to actually kick in. I was reading up on it and some people say it could be allergies. The dog food we use for both my dogs is beneful dog food. My dachshund doesn't have these problems at all.
    @Bery No need to be rude... It's 3am, trust me I am not wasting anytime. I am just trying to get an idea of what it could be. Kay thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I see a few possible causes for the itching. Itching can be caused by an allergic reaction (to flea bites, food or treats, grooming products or house-cleaning products, etc.), mites or steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot'). Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      Many dogs are allergic to flea bites and even one flea can cause havoc.

      You can get rid of the fleas on your dog with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. Check this link for recommendations http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where he roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on its use to control fleas see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check the ingredients of the food/treats. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. If they contain grains such as wheat or corn discontinue their use. Get food/treats that have no grains and contain meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      Discontinue any grooming product (or a house cleaning products) that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and anticeptic properties and the smell disappears within minutes after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.

      MITES

      There are three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      If the reason for the itching is mites, avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals that will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal) such as the ones commonly caused by the use of steroids like Prednisone, cortisone or the so called allergy shot or any secondary infections caused by scatching. I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  33. QUESTION:
    How can I help my 4 yo bluepits horrible skin? HELP!!?
    Originally we're from nashville tn, but we've moved to Panama (the country) Ever since we've gotten here our pitbulls have suffered horrible skin problems. We think it may be allergies, but we're very unsure. We've taken them to vets, they tell us the same things over and over, "it's just allergies, they will eventually go away", but they have not, and effectively worsened over time. At this point we're open to any solution. The patches on our male have shown up as very itchy red dry patches of skin, they've become hairless and bumpy. He has red, irritated eyes, that we've also tried using drop s for. His ears are dry and the smell he omits is horrible. We're trying not to bathe them often but its a hassle since their odor can become awfully strong. Our female pit's skin isn't as severe, but she has very itchy paws, which she's constantly licking to try and relieve. She also has horrible little bumps that look like peas under her skin. It is causing them very much pain and distress, but we just don't know what to do, PLEASE HELP!!!!!

    We inluded a picture for a better diagnosis
    As puppies, niether suffered so harshly from skin problems, nor fleas and ticks. Both had allergies to grass, but they don't make contact with grass regularly here in panama. There is an outburst of ticks here, which many of the neighborhood dogs suffer from also, and it is constant deticking and having to put medications for them.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections. See remedy below.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.

  34. QUESTION:
    Patchy hair loss on labrador retriever?
    My seven year old chocolate lab is losing her hair and now has several bald spots. It started out on her tummy and armpit area (for all four legs, I don't know what the actual name is for that part). Then it spread to her chest, and now it is on her back as well.

    She has a history of skin allergies, although we don't know exactly what it is that she is allergic to. The first thing I did when this started was use a topical hydro-cortisone spray that the vet gave us and put a little diaper cream on it. That always makes it better. It didn't work. I'm starting to think that it is not a skin allergy. When she gets an allergy outbreak, it usually attacks ONLY her tummy, armpits and ears (the inside part swells and gets pink). It always starts with the ears, but her ears are perfect right now, and it's spreading to the rest of her body. This never happens with her allergies!

    I am suspecting that it is a food allergy. We recently changed her diet from Eukanuba to Purina Pro Plan. We bought 3 kinds: chicken, lamb, and beef. She seemed fine with the chicken one and finished it, but this all started right at about the same time we switched her to the lamb & rice one (2-3 weeks ago).

    I really don't think that this is a parasite or fungus. She only goes outside to poop/pee or on walks, and is supervised. She doesn't interact much with other dogs. I don't think that it's ringworm because she sleeps in my room, is inside the house all the time, and is constantly petted. No one in my family has any itchiness or strange spots.

    She hasn't lost her appetite, isn't vomiting, and doesn't have diarrhea. She is just itchy. She was in heat a month ago.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost and prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  35. QUESTION:
    Bulldog skin problems!?
    I have two mini english bulldogs. I'm not arguing about breeds so don't tell me there is no such breed. I am a very responsible and caring owner, I am also a broke 20 year old college student and I am trying to avoid another vet bill. About a month ago Luke(9 months) developed a bald spot near his hind leg, I noticed that he was itching regularly so I brought him to the vet. She did a skin scrape and diagnosed it as demodex mange. She said it was localized and it would go away on it's own, and to bring him back if any other spots erupted so we could start the ivermectin treatment. In order to start that he would need to be off the trifaxis for a month because of a possible reaction. I gave him hydroxyzine for the itching. A couple of weeks later I went on vacation for four days, luke and sofia(19 months) stayed with my boyfriend (we live together). However, luke suffers from separation anxiety and when i came back he was missing hair all over his belly and on his back the lesions were everywhere(dry red patches, where hair was missing and he was miserable and itching desperately) I believe it was caused by stressed.I thought the demodex had become generalized and was freaking out. Back to the vet we went after doing some more skin scrapes she determined he had a staph infection and prescribed some antibiotics(simplicef). 3 days later he became all cleared up and good to go. That same week sofia started to develop some green and gooey eye discharge she has renal problems so I am extra careful with anything that concerns her, she was also itching her ear pretty bad and i started her on mometamox bc I know she has recurring yeast infections in her ears. She then started to develop the same ringworm like patches on her skin red and flaky with hair missing, it almost looks like she is being burnt with a cigar. I brought sofia to the vet and after some skin scrapes she determined that she had yeast in her ears and paws and low tear production in one eye(treated with triple antibiotic ointment) and to her lesions which i know are bacterial she told me to use a medicated shampoo and it would clear up in no time that was 9 days ago. I purchased malacetic wipes and vetoqinol sebozole shampoo and it has done nothing for her skin lesions, they are worse and more come out every day. I know that you can get fish-flex online without a prescription for which is generic cephalexin which works great for staph, but i don't know what the dosage would be. Also the vet said that staph is not contagious amongst dogs so what are the odds that they both develop the same skin condition within a few days of each other. I do not want to go back to the vet for yet another skin scrape and purchase antibiotics. If anyone has had any experience with bulldog skin problems or staph I would appreciate the advice. I have done a lot of research but the information is not consistent. Sofia weighs 23lbs she is xtra little because of her kidneys. I cook for her a balanced renal diet everyday with organic ingredients and she is on many natural supplements. She was diagnosed at 6 months and has beat the odds:) Luke weighs 35lbs he is still a puppy and eats wellness core.They both take nuvet vitamins and I do not believe they have food allergies they are also both on trifaxis so I don't believe it is ringworm, but it looks just like it. Perfectly circular hairless lesions.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc.)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')

      ALLERGIES

      For sensitive dogs just one flea can cause havoc. Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later. For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html
      and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check commercial food/treats ingredients. Dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with no grains and with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of grooming or house cleaning products that can be allergens. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  36. QUESTION:
    10-12 year old Chihuahua ripping hair out, tried so much...lost. VET is NO help at all.?
    My dog is an 10-12 year old Chihuahua he has been to vet and was given comfortis for his fleas and his constant itching and biting of his skin. however that pill has not worked and now he is so aggressively pulling his hair out that his back is nearly bald all the way to his neck. The vet suggested oatmeal baths weekly and I have done that and it has not helped. Then i was told it could be a hot spot so I have applied that treatment per instructions...this is also not helping. then they switched to a flea bath, that contained aloe and was to do that every two weeks. he looks ridiculous and constantly biting. i bought him a sweater for two reasons, one he is always cold and two to stop the biting, he likes the sweater but pushes it up with his nose and bites and then pulls it back down with his teeth. he has scaly dry skin, on the back of his ears and everywhere else. (he also has an ear rinse that is medicated for his ear infections) i dont know what to do anymore. i found this dog and felt bad and got him his shots and have taken him to the vet, but nothing seems to be helping. I dont know what to do with him.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reasons for skin issues (i.e. itching, skin irritation, hair loss, etc.) include:

      - Allergic reactions to flea bites, food/treats, grooming or house-cleaning products, etc.
      - Mites
      - Fungal/Bacterial infections (ringworm, yeast, staph etc. that may cause an unpleasant odor)
      - Steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot')
      - Bathing too often

      Scratching opens the door to skin infections (remedy below).

      ALLERGIES

      Even if not visible, you can always see the debris fleas leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If placed in water, they will turn red. You can get rid of the fleas with natural methods to avoid exposure to toxic chemicals in popular spot-on and pill flea medications which will cause harm sooner or later http://www.apnm.org/publications/resources/fleachemfin.pdf For recommendations see http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where your dog roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html

      The dog's digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. Discontinue any food/treat with corn, wheat, etc. Get ones with meat as a primary ingredient chicken, lamb, salmon, etc. If possible, raw meat diet is best http://www.healthypetjournal.com/default.aspx?tabid=19116

      Discontinue use of potential allergens i.e. grooming or house cleaning products. For a while, use white vinegar as the cleaning agent for your floors, counters, etc. Vinegar has strong cleaning and antiseptic properties and the smell disappears quickly after use. See http://www.vinegarworkswonders.com/faqs.asp

      Bathing too often strips the natural oils that protect the skin. Bathing once a month is enough.

      MITES

      Three types of mites attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      Avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals which will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend the use of natural products. Search the Internet to find them. I prefer the spray type treatment which is effective, easy to use, and inexpensive that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript allergy shot ) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains and result in undesirable health complications, including skin problems.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For many skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop within a few days. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mv_session_id=eDEGJydw&mp=s&s=Sulfur%2C+USP+Grade

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder and rub on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 1 tablespoon of flower of sulfur powder with 1/4 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. This method works well for smaller skin areas. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

      Apply daily until the problem clears.


how to treat yeast infection in dogs ears naturally

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